Finse 1222 and chasing polar erudition

The only way to get there is by train or on skis, mountains all around - no roads leading in. Nansen trained there, modern-day explorers still do. It´s one of the few places in this country that resemble polar areas. In all the white, the snow and the ice, Finse 1222 is to be found. A historic hotel that hosted us for a couple of days while filming the first sequences for our upcoming video project. 

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Further down the road, Finse will be one of the places where we put our psychics and gear to the test. It´s raw - and like one of the hotel owners Trygve Norman said during our talk with him; it´s as real as it gets. Ironically, the weather was magical this time around — pure bluebird, not a single cloud in sight. Sking up Hardangerjøkulen mountain in the sunshine was a rich experience, so was learning about the history of Finse and talking about our expedition heroes surrounded by the area where they tried and failed until perfection.

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During our talk with Trygve, Norwegian mentality became a topic. At Finse explorers from all around gather regularly, sharing their lessons learned, prepping each other as well as beginners. There is something unique about that, the willingness to help others succeed with their missions even though this is a somewhat competitive field. In a lot of countries, knowledge is a superpower one does not share. For us, learning from all the experienced people who are willing to have a chat, is extremely valuable. Sure - we have been hiking and skiing in all kind of conditions, we´ve crossed Greenland, but none of that can compare to the test Breaking 3000 will put us trough. Talking to and learning from as many wise people as possible is one of our main focuses at this moment in time - the same goes for passing the learnings on through our different channels. Many thanks to everyone who has been generous with us so far.

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At the time of writing, we have returned to Oslo to finish up our bachelor’s degree. Next landmark for Breaking will be sailing by Greenland with Alun Hubbard this summer to learn more about what is happening with the ice cap. Until then; stay tuned for video from Finse and other news along the way. 

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 Have a mighty fine Easter!

Johanne Hoff Comment
A quick update on the latest news

Hi, there. All good? We sure hope so!

Time flies when a lot is going on, which it currently is. Exciting news continues to reach us, which makes us feel even more assertive about our mission. Again; thank you for all the support!

A week ago we had our first meeting with Remote Health International, the team that will make sure we are equipped for any unforeseen health issues while on our expedition. Re-med will provide us with the necessary training before hitting the ice, they will also be our landline if anything should happen along the way.

Other great news is that DNX - Dagens næringslivs creative agency, has taken us on. That means they will coordinate commercial activities, and help us tell our story through great content while we focus on our training and overall planning.

On talk about training, Finse 1222 recently became a friend of our expedition. Since Finse is one of the closest places you get to polar conditions in Norway, we will be doing a lot of our testing and training over there. Finse 1222 will make sure we sleep and eat well.

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We could say a lot more about these three, which we will in the weeks to come. For now, we just wanted to keep you posted while at work up north.

Talk to you soon!

J & J

Johanne Hoff Comment
First coordination meeting with the Professor of Glaciology, Alun Hubbard.

Last Thursday we got a visit from Professor Alun Hubbard. He had been working at the university in Tromsø for a while, and fortunately managed to stop by Oslo before heading back to UK.

For those of you that didn't read the blog post about Alun, he is a professor of glaciology, and have over 150 articles to his credit.

It was good finally finding the time to sit down together and talk about the expedition. We got to share our vision on how Alun can participate in this project - and he got to share his thoughts about how we can support his science while we are on Greenland. We will most likely be taking ice samples during the expedition, but we haven't found out exactly how this ought to be carried out yet. What is very interesting is that there seems to be a lot of crucial undiscovered information in parts of the ice cap where we will be going. Alun is now looking for possibilities to make the gear needed for taking samples of the ice light enough for us to carry. Innovating the equipment will make it easy for us to take samples in the tent and send the information back home.

Along the way, Alun will also contribute with his wisdom in our content to make sure our expedition also impacts the common knowledge about the environmental aspect - which is important to us.

We will make sure to keep you updated on this matter.

J&J

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Jostein SirevågComment
Say hi to Lars Ebbesen; expedition mogul, optimist, advisor

Meet the legend Lars Ebbesen aka "the mother of all expeditions”.

Lars is our expedition advisor. He has had something to do with almost all record holding expedition done by Norwegians during the last twenty to thirty years. The other day, we listened to a presentation Lars did at Sportsnett in Oslo. He talked about the expeditions they offer in Ousland Explorers, before answering questions the audience had concerning winter expeditions. It was during the introduction he was called "the mother of all expeditions", which isn't far from the truth. You might ask yourself: who is this legend?

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Lars has eleven trips across Greenland, and he has been to the South Pole. He also fell in the lead on his way to the North Pole, and several trips to the Andes and Himalaya - and there is more. Lars started the expedition company "Hvitserk" back in the days, where he helped several other companies in this branch to make a name for themselves. Lars has been helping us since the start of our planning. He is a bit crazy, untraditional, innovative and an optimist - making him perfect for the Breaking3000 team.

J&J

Jostein SirevågComment
Meet Alun Hubbard, Professor of Glaciology.

On our first Greenland crossing in 2016, we met Alun on the east coast, in the town Tasiilaq. At that time he was researching the mountain regions on Greenland, in cooperation with a team from Salomon who made a free ski-movie called "Guilt-trip".

The Breaking 3000 expedition is more than just setting a distance-record. It is an essential message to the world regarding climate changes in the polar regions. Alun was the first person that came to mind when started planning this aspect of the expedition. Therefore we will cooperate with Alun in showing these changes, and already in two weeks, we will meet in Oslo to plan further. After this meeting, you will also get to know Alun better. Meanwhile, read about Alun below;

Alun Hubbard is a scientist and glaciologist with an appetite for unorthodox adventures. He investigates glaciers and ice sheets, how they respond to climate change and drive global sea-level rise years with over 150 publications to his credit. This work has taken him to some of the most remote and harsh regions of the planet - from deep-field Antarctica to the very northern fringes of Greenland - often working during the frigid winter months in small, self-sufficient teams far from help and the relative comfort of official bases. He's also a mountaineer and led over 30 expeditions with two dozen first ascents of mountains in Alaska, Patagonia, Antarctica, South Georgia and Greenland to his credit. Many of these small, self-reliant and environmentally friendly expeditions have been carried out from steel, ice-strengthened sailboat which he purchased with a friend back in 1998 to provide a cheap and mobile mountain hut. This sailboat is still floating with plans to transit the NW Passage this coming summer to carry out a series of state of the Arctic Ocean monitoring experiments which will complement those on the ice sheet during the Breaking 3000 expedition.

We are thrilled to have Alun aboard the Breaking 3000 team.

J&J

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Jostein SirevågComment
New year, new goals!

Happy new year everyone!

We have now established a Facebook page. This will make it easier for us to distribute blog posts and updates to you:)

Our last main goal was to have the website up and running and share this with all of you within December 2018. The feedback on the project has been incredible! There is so many that finds this expedition interesting and have shared it with their friends. We hope you will continue to do so. Thank you for the support so far!

Now we are very very excited about reaching the goals set for 2019. This spring we will connect our upcoming main sponsors to the project. We are looking forward to sharing who they are, and how they will contribute.

We will also update you on our training, equipment developments and the project in general. Stay tuned people of the internet!

- J&J

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Jostein SirevågComment
First post - Facelift by Johanne

We are so lucky that the best Johanne Koivunen Hoff gave our website a real facelift. Now we are finally ready to invite all of you out there to take part in this journey. 2019 will be a really exciting year for us since our main sponsors will get aboard during this year. Therefore, we promise to frequently update you on the latest and greatest regarding the next big leap in Norwegian polar history.

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